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Five Tips for Managing Pediatric Dental Anxiety

Teeth anxiety is prevalent in children. It is found that as many as 19.5% of school-age children are afraid of dentists. Treating children with dental anxiety presents a challenge to dental clinicians. In fact, it is reported that one of the most problematic types of patients is reported by dentists as fearful children. Dental anxiety is not only problematic to clinicians, but also has the potential to adversely affect patient access to optimal dental care. The next few behavioral strategies should help treat children with dental anxiety.


In general, children tend to do their best when their lives are predictable. When they are told in advance what happens, they are more likely to tolerate the procedure. Providing information is especially important for anxious children. The clinician should consider describing what he or she is going to do and what the child will experience.


Relaxation strategies are very useful for children who are obviously anxious or anxious to the clinician. Many children feel comfortable after a simple deep-breathing exercise, which involves deep breathing and slow exhalation. Requiring children to blow bubbles through their wands (items purchased during the summer) produces similar effects, sometimes distracting.


Distraction may help reduce dental anxiety. Clinicians may consider several distracting approaches. First, the toy may also distract the child in the dental chair if the child plays a toy in the waiting room. Obviously, not all toys or programs are suitable for this strategy, but at least it should be considered.


The positive reinforcement of compliments and small but tangible rewards (such as stickers, pretend tattoos and baseball cards) can be a useful incentive for cooperation and “bravery”. Enhancement can be released frequently; younger children need more frequent reinforcement of children. There is actually not much reinforcement, although clinicians should try to be real.

Parent’s participation

There are several ways parents can help deal with anxious children. First, clinicians should not hesitate to ask their parents for help if their child has serious difficulties. In other situations, the child may exhibit this anxiety and the child’s parent may have some strategies that may be most effective for the child.

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