Archive for March 2018

Dental Sealants

Teeth brushing and flossing are the best ways to help prevent cavities, but it’s not always easy to brush and floss clean every nook and cranny of the teeth, especially those back teeth you use to chew (molars). Molars are rough, unseen and a favorite place for leftover food and cavity-causing bacteria to hide. But then, there is another safety net to help keep the teeth clean, called dental sealants.

Dental sealants or fissure sealants is a thin, plastic coating, painted on the chewing surfaces of teeth, usually the back teeth (premolars and molars) to prevent tooth decay. Dental sealants quickly bond into depressions and grooves the teeth, forming a protective shield over the enamel of each tooth.

A dental sealant is a preservative treatment of that is part of the minimal interventions of dentistry approach to dental and oral care. It facilitates the prevention and quick intervention, in order to prevent or stop the tooth decay process before it reaches the end stage of disease, which is known as the cavitation of a tooth. As soon as the tooth is cavitated, it requires dental restoration in order to repair the damage, this emphasizes the importance of prevention in preserving our teeth for a lifetime of chewing.

HOW DENTAL SEALANTS WORK

Dental sealants can be thought of as a raincoat of the teeth. When the cavity-causing bacteria that live in the mouth meet leftover food particles, they produce acids that can create holes in the teeth. The application of sealants keeps this bit of food out and stops bacteria acid from settling on the teeth, just as the raincoat keeps the rain from beating you.

WHO NEEDS DENTAL SEALANTS

Dental sealants can be applied as soon as child’s permanent back teeth, the molars have fully grown. This is done so that the deep grooves and pits that are seen on the chewing surface of the teeth are filled in before cavities sets in. Protecting the molars and premolars from the very start greatly reduce the chances of getting cavities or worse dental issues later in life.

Most times sealants are applied during childhood, some adults may need to have them applied later in life if they never had the procedure done earlier or if there is the development of pit in teeth where there was none previously.

HOW TO CARE FOR DENTAL SEALANTS

As soon as a dental sealant is applied, and set on a tooth, it requires no special treatment. The patient only needs to continue brushing twice daily and flossing regularly. Additionally, protection and an extra brilliant smile can be gotten through the use of a fluoridated, non-alcoholic mouthwash after brushing the teeth.

 

More

Are You Brushing Your Teeth Too Hard?

If your teeth are sensitive, brushing too hard or using the wrong toothbrush can aggravate the symptoms. Learn appropriate brushing techniques.

When it comes to brushing, there is proper technology. Too much to brushing – or using the wrong toothbrush – can damage the teeth and gums, cause problems with enamel wear and gums, which can lead to tooth sensitivity. “People tend to brush their teeth aggressively, thinking it’s the only way they can make their teeth clean and look whiter.” “That’s going to be counterproductive as it will not only cause gums to fail but will also wear white, teeth Lustrous enamel makes them look yellowerier and deeper. “When this happens, you’re at risk of developing sensitive teeth.

Not sure if you are brushing too hard? Look at your toothbrush. If you have been using it for three months or less, it should still look newer. “If it looks mediocre, then this is a sign that you brush too hard,”

The Proper Way to Brush Your Teeth

It takes a lot of mindfulness, but you can change your way of suffering. Follow these tips for proper brushing to reduce tooth sensitivity and prevent damage to your teeth and gums:Use a soft bristled toothbrush. Choose a product with an ADA seal to be replaced every three months – or in the event of a malfunction, replace.Toothbrush and gums into a 45 degree angle. In this way, the mane can reach and clean under your gums,Gently move the brush back and forth. ADA recommends using a short, full-tooth stroke to clean the outer, inner, and chew surfaces of the tooth. (If your gingival recession is severe, the dentist may suggest that you try rolling techniques.) If you are using an electric toothbrush, have it do its job and gently slide it over your teeth instead of pushing them toward your teeth. To make sure you use a light grip, try placing your toothbrush in your uncontrolled hands.

More

Sensitive Teeth: What Your Dentist Wants You to Know

Life habits often cause or contribute to tooth sensitivity. For example, a harmful habit is to brush your teeth aggressively with a hard toothbrush. If you brush too hard, you can rub off the outer enamel that protects your teeth, revealing the teeth that contain nerve endings, he said. If exposed, the nerve endings in the layer of tooth tissue known as dentin will emit a painful signal when stimulated.

Clenching or molars may wear enamel, expose nerves in the teeth and make them more sensitive to temperature and changes in sugary or sticky foods.

Aging can also play a role in tooth sensitivity. As you grow older and gingival recession, the layer of cementum below the gingival line may wear out, causing the teeth to stick to the bones. Without cementum, your teeth become more exposed and become more sensitive. Gum disease can also cause gingival recession and lead to more nerve exposure.

In addition, acid reflux may help sensitive teeth. “The stomach acid is highly acidic. If the food you eat causes acid reflux and there is a constant stomach acid in the mouth, it can damage the enamel on your teeth,” Taylor said. Some of the most serious tooth-sensitive cases occur in acid reflux patients

When to see your dentist

Regular dental examination is very important, so that you can prevent or manage excessive accumulation of plaque and periodontal disease, because they can also increase the sensitivity.

Cold sensitivity is more common, but not thermolabile. If you are sensitive to hot food, go to the dentist. “This may be a more serious problem that should be solved to prevent more serious problems, such as abscesses.”

The AGD suggests that when talking to dentists about tooth sensitivity, be sure to explain when it hurts and what helps relieve pain. These details can help guide your dental care. “Your dentist can advise you whether it will help bond you to the area of ​​the tooth in question, especially exposed roots.

More

Five Tips for Managing Pediatric Dental Anxiety

Teeth anxiety is prevalent in children. It is found that as many as 19.5% of school-age children are afraid of dentists. Treating children with dental anxiety presents a challenge to dental clinicians. In fact, it is reported that one of the most problematic types of patients is reported by dentists as fearful children. Dental anxiety is not only problematic to clinicians, but also has the potential to adversely affect patient access to optimal dental care. The next few behavioral strategies should help treat children with dental anxiety.

Information

In general, children tend to do their best when their lives are predictable. When they are told in advance what happens, they are more likely to tolerate the procedure. Providing information is especially important for anxious children. The clinician should consider describing what he or she is going to do and what the child will experience.

Relaxation

Relaxation strategies are very useful for children who are obviously anxious or anxious to the clinician. Many children feel comfortable after a simple deep-breathing exercise, which involves deep breathing and slow exhalation. Requiring children to blow bubbles through their wands (items purchased during the summer) produces similar effects, sometimes distracting.

Stretching

Distraction may help reduce dental anxiety. Clinicians may consider several distracting approaches. First, the toy may also distract the child in the dental chair if the child plays a toy in the waiting room. Obviously, not all toys or programs are suitable for this strategy, but at least it should be considered.

Strengthen

The positive reinforcement of compliments and small but tangible rewards (such as stickers, pretend tattoos and baseball cards) can be a useful incentive for cooperation and “bravery”. Enhancement can be released frequently; younger children need more frequent reinforcement of children. There is actually not much reinforcement, although clinicians should try to be real.

Parent’s participation

There are several ways parents can help deal with anxious children. First, clinicians should not hesitate to ask their parents for help if their child has serious difficulties. In other situations, the child may exhibit this anxiety and the child’s parent may have some strategies that may be most effective for the child.

More